GOAL blog: India ramping up pangasius output; Indonesian tilapia production closing on China


News   02/01/2018 - Nguyễn Trí Tín


Guangzhou, CHINA -- Undercurrent News is reporting live from the Global Outlook on Aquaculture Leadership (GOAL) conference taking place from Sept. 19 to Sept. 22 in Guangzhou, China.

The annual GOAL event, organized by the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) discusses key themes for the aquaculture industry, including fishmeal sourcing, global shrimp production data and approaches to combat human trafficking in the industry.

In addition, the 13th annual tilapia industry development forum, organized by the China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance, or CAPPMA, is being held in the same hotel as GOAL this week.

You can review all our coverage of the 2015 GAA conference in Vancouver, Canada here.
 

India ramping up pangasius output 

While Vietnam will stay by far the largest producer of pangasius, Indian production is on the increase. 

Indian production was 435,000 metric tons in 2015, but is set to increase to 447,500t in 2016. 

Then, in 2017, Indian production is set to increase to 462,500t.

For 2018, the forecast, presented by Ragnar Tveteras, has Indian production going to 640,000t. 

This is still under half the level Vietnam is forecasted to produce in 2018, however.

By Tom Seaman 

Indonesian tilapia production closing in on China

According to data presented by Ragnar Tveteras, Indonesian tilapia production is to close the gap with China by 2018. 

As you can see from the data presented below, Indonesia produced 1.05 million metric tons of tilapia in 2015, but this is forecast to grow to around 1.25m by 2018.

China, meanwhile, produced 1.71m in 2015, which is forecasted to increase, then drop again to around the same level in 2018.

 Production in Egypt is also forecasted to increase.  

He also presented a slide showing the total production growth outlook through 2018, which also illustrates how prices in the main US market have been falling. 

By Tom Seaman